Prospect Theater Company

Cara Reichel, Producing Artistic Director

Melissa Huber, Managing Director

presents

THE ALCHEMISTS

Book by PETER MILLS & CARA REICHEL

Music & Lyrics by PETER MILLS

Arrangements by DANIEL FEYER & PETER MILLS

 

Theater for the New City

155 First Avenue (between 9 and l0 Sts.)

Tickets (212) 898-4444 or www.smarttix.com

www.prospecttheater.org

 

April 26 - May 18

 

Directed by CARA REICHEL

Set Design SCOTT ARONOW

Costume Design SIDNEY J. SHANNON

Lighting Design JI-YOUN CHANG

Musical Director DANIEL FEYER

Stage Manager BAILIE SLEVIN

 

 

CAST OF CHARACTERS

Stanley Auburn, Jr. - Benjamin Eakeley

Nicholas Auburn - Damian Long

Nathaniel Plum - Tony Valles

Marcus Plum - Blake Hackler

Anne Quintrell - Kelly Snyder

Stanley Auburn, Jr., age 14 - Jordan Wolfe

Nicholas Auburn, age 12 - Joshua Marmer

Nathaniel Plum, age 13 - Seamus Boyle

Marcus Plum, age 11 - Jonathan Demar

Anne Quintrell, age 12 - Danielle Melanie Brown

Stanley Auburn, Sr. - Larry Brustofski

Albert Loomis - Richard Todd Adams

Mrs. Cooper - Carol A. Hickey

Molly Dean - Erica Wright

Mrs. Irons - Navida Stein

Sylvester - Peter Maris

Dr. Wolfram - Greg Horton

The always-impressive Prospect Theater Company is at it again with a promising new musical called THE ALCHEMISTS. The title hints at the oft-performed experiment, an attempt to transform base lead into precious gold, but really refers to the ultimate futures of five youngsters who, onstage, coexist as young teens and adults.

THE ALCHEMISTS, running a healthy two and a half hours or more, seems to fly by in a veil of song and intellectual debate. Where some tunes are merely satisfactory, the majority are quite good, if not at the pinnacle of artistic achievement. Written with purpose and passion, each song serves to propel the plot, the discourse, and expose the inner thoughts of the many, many players. While the score and book are nice, the fabulous set, and a few choice performances make the most impact. Though the actors generally get lost in the crowd, a few get the chance to shine, however fleeting those golden moments may be.

An ambitious undertaking, a period-piece musical with a company of this size in a space nary big enough to hold them all, THE ALCHEMISTS does succeed in portraying a sense of childhood wonderment that is generally lost by young adulthood. By showing the five children as both youths and adults, we experience the tricks that time play on the spirit, on destiny, and even on morality. The five children, two sets of brothers and one orphaned girl, form the center. Two boys are the masters’ sons, and the other pair sons of a clergyman. All four, Stanley, Nicholas, Nathaniel and Marcus, find a variable muse in the form of Anne. One loves her, one wants to wed her, one is obsessed, and the other is "an artist" (wink, wink). The alchemy part comes in as they grow up and take on new roles, as other suffer terrible ends.

In the end THE ALCHEMISTS gets an A for effort!

- Kessa De Santis -

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